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How to Win Friends and Influence Buyers

Posted by Brian Jud on July 16, 2015 at 8:55 AM Comments comments (0)

The 1936 book, “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” has sold over 15 million copies and still ranks in the top 100 Amazon best sellers regularly. Why? Because its content is timeless. For example, here are six things to make people like you (and all can be applied to selling your book): 1) Become genuinely interested in other people, 2) Smile, 3) Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound, 4) Be a good listener, 5) Talk in terms of other people’s interests, and 6) Make the other person feel important – and do it sincerely.

How to Win Friends and Influence Buyers

Posted by Brian Jud on July 16, 2015 at 8:55 AM Comments comments (0)

The 1936 book, “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” has sold over 15 million copies and still ranks in the top 100 Amazon best sellers regularly. Why? Because its content is timeless. For example, here are six things to make people like you (and all can be applied to selling your book): 1) Become genuinely interested in other people, 2) Smile, 3) Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound, 4) Be a good listener, 5) Talk in terms of other people’s interests, and 6) Make the other person feel important – and do it sincerely.

JK Rowling says to learn from your mistakes

Posted by Brian Jud on July 8, 2015 at 8:50 AM Comments comments (0)

JK Rowling was divorced, jobless, a single parent and almost homeless. But she had an old typewriter and a big idea. You know what happened next. But there was an interesting comment she made about her situation. She said, “The knowledge that you have emerged wiser and stronger from setbacks means that you are, ever after, secure in your ability to survive.” (Readers Digest, June 2015, p 21)

Don???t Believe Everything You Think

Posted by Brian Jud on July 1, 2015 at 8:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Our past experiences skew the ways in which we make judgments and decisions. However, our experiences are the result of how we interpreted an event or circumstance. Further complicating the decision process is that our analysis is distorted by our biases and the result may or may not have had anything to do with the reality of the situation. Here are the Top Ten Ways to Learn From Mistakes.

 

1. Publishers are outcome oriented – a book was a success or it wasn’t – and we laud our successes and ignore the failures. A better technique is to analyze the process leading to the result. A good outcome can lead us to stick with a questionable strategy that worked this time, and a bad outcome can cause us to change or discard a strategy that may actually be better, except for this time.

2. If we don’t learn from our mistakes we may be fooled into thinking we have more control over our success than we actually do.

3. Honest feedback is essential for making better decisions in the future. But if our intuition is distorted by our interpretation of our past (good or bad) we may sabotage how we evaluate evidence.

4. Predictions based on experience make the assumption that the future will resemble the past.

5. Just because something is obvious after the fact doesn’t mean it could have been predicted.

6. Recognizing a potential problem requires a different approach than solving an actual problem.

7. The goal of learning should dominate the natural tendency to assign blame – on yourself or others.

8. “Creative conflict” enhances decision-making. It is better to learn about problems from colleagues when there is still time to fix them than from the market when it is too late.

9. Perform a premortem (vs. postmortem) by imaging yourself in the future and experiencing some problem. Use “hindsight” to think about how to avoid it.

10. Focus, but not too much. If you over-evaluate a situation too much or long you may lose out on an unexpected opportunity.

 

Authors should follow the tech crowd

Posted by Tom Chalmers on June 9, 2015 at 9:50 AM Comments comments (0)

As the founder of an online licensing platform it’s little wonder that I find myself referring to technology quite a bit. And I certainly make no excuses for it. The digital revolution continues to gather pace and those not embracing it are only being left behind in its wake.


Traditional publishing has a legacy of being somewhat slow paced and a little ponderous when it comes to thinking outside the box – for want of a less cliché cliché – when it comes to new routes to market or incorporating new ideas. However, in its defence these attitudes have improved, and more and more publishers and authors are getting to grips with technological advances.


On this note, a recent article that did capture my attention was one which focussed on how the publishing world is reaching out to readers through crowdfunding websites such as Kickstarter. Since launching in 2009, Kickstarter is reported to have seen $70m pledged to projects in the site’s publishing category. But recent years have seen the number of successful books-related projects more than double, from 735 in 2011 to 2064 in 2014.


Of course the idea of testing the water and gauging initial responses to their work is nothing new for authors. A synopsis and a selected few chapters have long been used to wet the appetite of the reader, the publisher or the agent, but such online projects can now take it to the next level. And the take-up for these has especially been apparent amongst aspiring indie or self-published authors.


Funding for specific projects, even support with copy editing, cover design and distribution are all now relatively commonplace. These have come to prominence both through the ease of set up and the realisation of the opportunity to build interest and a community around projects. By this I mean engaging with a potential audience throughout the creative process to help create a stronger, longer-lasting relationship between the reader and the creator.


The simple fact is that the more authors can do to showcase their work and interact with interested parties the better. Be this through a crowdfunding site to help form, create and shape the content through to a licensing platform such as IPR License to showcase and monetise the rights to this content on a global scale.


And the common factor within this publishing journey? Technology of course.

 

Stop selling your books (and sell more of them)

Posted by Brian Jud on May 25, 2015 at 10:35 AM Comments comments (0)

Uber (the world’s largest taxi company) owns no vehicles, Alibaba (the world’s most valuable retailer) has no inventory, and Airbnb (the world’s largest accommodation provider) owns no real estate. Stop thinking in terms of selling tangible books and start selling the benefits of your intangible content.

 

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Brian Jud is the Executive Director of APSS (www.bookapss.org) - formerly SPAN. He is also the author of How to Make Real Money Selling Books. Brian offers commission-based sales of books to buyers in non-bookstore markets. Contact Brian at P. O. Box 715, Avon, CT 06001-0715; (860) 675-1344; brianjud@bookmarketing.com or www.premiumbookcompany.com twitter.com/bookmarketing

 

Have a new book by tomorrow!

Posted by Brian Jud on May 18, 2015 at 10:35 AM Comments comments (0)

You don’t have to write a new book, just describe it differently. Tell retailers your content will help them be more profitable, Tell librarians it will help their patrons. Tell associations it can help them increase their membership. Tell corporate buyers it can help them solve a business problem. Your content will seem pertinent to them, and that can help you sell many more books. Your book is not what it is, but what it does for the buyer.


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Brian Jud is the Executive Director of APSS (www.bookapss.org) - formerly SPAN. He is also the author of How to Make Real Money Selling Books. Brian offers commission-based sales of books to buyers in non-bookstore markets. Contact Brian at P. O. Box 715, Avon, CT 06001-0715; (860) 675-1344; brianjud@bookmarketing.com or www.premiumbookcompany.com twitter.com/bookmarketing

10 reasons to sell books to non-bookstore buyers

Posted by Brian Jud on May 11, 2015 at 10:30 AM Comments comments (0)

Over 500,000 ISBNs were issued last year and most of those authors want to get on bookstore shelves. The problem is, there is limited shelf space available. You may find it more profitable to find special-sales opportunities. Here are some of the benefits that could accrue from non-bookstore marketing:

1.Increased sales and revenue. Increase your sales in a marketplace larger than the bookstore market

2.Recurring revenue. Your customers may place recurring orders

3.Lower acquisition costs. Selling to an existing customer is less expensive than it is to acquire another customer

4.Lower unit costs. The greater the quantity in which you print, the lower your unit cost will be

5.Increased profitability naturally follows, since the lower your unit cost the greater your profitability at the same selling price

6.Less competition. When you make a sales call on corporate buyers you have their undivided attention

7.Less discounting. Buyers usually do not have immediate access to competitive pricing

8.Fewer returns. Most non-retail buyers do not expect to return books

9.Negotiable terms. You may increase your flexibility in negotiations since discounts are not fixed

10.Improved cash flow. Most corporations pay in 30 to 60 days

 

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Brian Jud is the Executive Director of APSS (www.bookapss.org) - formerly SPAN. He is also the author of How to Make Real Money Selling Books. Brian offers commission-based sales of books to buyers in non-bookstore markets. Contact Brian at P. O. Box 715, Avon, CT 06001-0715; (860) 675-1344; brianjud@bookmarketing.com or www.premiumbookcompany.com twitter.com/bookmarketing

 

Author Education Key to Showcasing Work

Posted by Tom Chalmers on April 2, 2015 at 6:10 AM Comments comments (0)

In my previous blog post I talked about how self-published authors need to rise to the challenge of exerting greater control over their works to ensure they maximise all potential sales and revenue streams. Judging from the response we’ve had to the recent launch of the IPR License and The Writing Bank: Write, Learn, Earn Masterclasses, especially in the licensing and marketing sessions, this certainly appears to be happening.


How to best market and showcase titles has long been a question posed by self-published and indie authors far and wide. This obviously remains a priority for the majority, which is why the IPR License platform continues to prove so popular as an additional route to reaching a wider audience and potentially generating international interest.


The relationship between marketing, sales and licensing is closer than many writers think. Having said that, for far too long licensing and rights were often words met with quizzical expressions among the writing community. Education continues to remain vital in raising this important sector’s profile and it’s up to companies operating within this field, as well as organisations such as AiA, to carry on outlining the potential benefits when and where possible.


Being a successful indie or self-published author isn’t easy. As I’ve said a number of times, individual books in this market, as well as traditional publishing fields, should be treated as their own small business. For any small business to work it has to maximise all revenue streams effectively and efficiently.


Technology can often play a big role in this process and it’s great to see that more authors of all levels are really starting to embrace advances throughout the learning, creative, marketing, licensing and distribution process. The publishing industry can often be described as slow moving and traditional but it’s those forward-thinking indie and self-published authors who are really helping to propel the market to new heights through finding the most innovative ways to showcase and ultimately sell their works. Long may it continue.

 

How You Can Come Up With More Marketing Ideas

Posted by Brian Jud on February 27, 2015 at 7:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Traditional thinking has a powerful undertow. Well-meaning friends, colleagues or even family members may discourage you from “rocking the boat.” But in today’s rapidly changing marketplace, holding steady really means falling behind. Move, evaluate, adapt, strategize and move again. Act like a professional boxer as you bob and weave, looking for weak points in your adversaries’ strategies on which to launch your competitive attack.

 

Conduct a creative-thinking session to come up with new ways to tackle the challenge you have defined. Gather two or more people in a room and start thinking. Have some fun while you are at it. Use a chalkboard, flip chart or some means to record the ideas that is in plain view of all participants. Here are the Top Ten Ways to Make Your Creative Sessions More Productive.

1. Stimulate as many responses as possible. Think quantity, not quality at this point. Do not judge any idea at the time it is offered, so people feel free to contribute. .

 

2. Ask questions beginning with "What if…?" What if you condensed the information in your book and made a series of booklets? What if you sold your book as a premium to corporations? .

 

3. Ask questions in a way that will stimulate multiple responses. If you say, "Where else can we sell this book?" then the first plausible idea will answer the question. Instead, ask, "In how many other markets can we sell this book?" This will generate other possible solutions such as discount stores, government agencies, book clubs or academic markets.

 

4. Think about your ultimate consumers. Where do they seek the information in your book? In libraries? Then sell your books to librarians. Are your titles of interest to business travelers? Then sell your books in hotel gift shops or airport stores. Do they buy through catalogs? Then there is where your books should be. In how many ways can you make your books more accessible to prospective buyers?

 

5. Take a broader view of your potential. The video program You’re On The Air trains authors to create and perform on television and radio shows. It also helped train civil engineers to perform on the air when they were called upon to do so as the local expert. How many other people can utilize the information in your books?

 

6. Stop selling your books. Start selling the benefits that people receive from buying your books. Retail-store managers want increased traffic and profits. Demonstrate how your promotional efforts will drive people into their store. Librarians are not profit driven, but they want to help their patrons. What do your customers need and how can you help them meet their needs?

 

7. Emulate successful people. When you hit a mental block, think about what others have done to sell millions of books. What would Patricia Cornwell, Malcolm Gladwell or John Grisham do in your situation?

 

8. Break the rules. Mark Victor Hansen and Jack Canfield were told that a book of short, emotional, feel-good stories would never sell. Their Chicken Soup for the Soul series has sold over 100 million copies. What obstacles are in your path, and how can they be removed or sidestepped?

 

9. Just do something. When one author was asked how to be creative, he replied, "It’s simple, you just take something and do something to it. Then you do something else to it. Pretty soon you’ve got something."

 

10. Use manipulation verbs to force you to think from a different perspective. How can you expand, combine, reduce or adapt your content?

 

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Brian Jud is the Executive Director of the Association of Publishers for Special Sales (APSS – www.bookapss.org– formerly SPAN) and author of How to Make Real Money Selling Books. Contact Brian at brianjud@bookmarketing.com or www.premiumbookcompany.com and twitter @bookmarketing

 

 


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