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Author Education Key to Showcasing Work

Posted by Tom Chalmers on April 2, 2015 at 6:10 AM Comments comments (0)

In my previous blog post I talked about how self-published authors need to rise to the challenge of exerting greater control over their works to ensure they maximise all potential sales and revenue streams. Judging from the response we’ve had to the recent launch of the IPR License and The Writing Bank: Write, Learn, Earn Masterclasses, especially in the licensing and marketing sessions, this certainly appears to be happening.


How to best market and showcase titles has long been a question posed by self-published and indie authors far and wide. This obviously remains a priority for the majority, which is why the IPR License platform continues to prove so popular as an additional route to reaching a wider audience and potentially generating international interest.


The relationship between marketing, sales and licensing is closer than many writers think. Having said that, for far too long licensing and rights were often words met with quizzical expressions among the writing community. Education continues to remain vital in raising this important sector’s profile and it’s up to companies operating within this field, as well as organisations such as AiA, to carry on outlining the potential benefits when and where possible.


Being a successful indie or self-published author isn’t easy. As I’ve said a number of times, individual books in this market, as well as traditional publishing fields, should be treated as their own small business. For any small business to work it has to maximise all revenue streams effectively and efficiently.


Technology can often play a big role in this process and it’s great to see that more authors of all levels are really starting to embrace advances throughout the learning, creative, marketing, licensing and distribution process. The publishing industry can often be described as slow moving and traditional but it’s those forward-thinking indie and self-published authors who are really helping to propel the market to new heights through finding the most innovative ways to showcase and ultimately sell their works. Long may it continue.

 

Ten more book-marketing tips

Posted by Brian Jud on February 12, 2015 at 10:00 AM Comments comments (0)

Here are ten more book-marketing tips that may help you sell more books profitably.

 

1. A fundamental rule of marketing is to find a need and fill it.

2. Given the choice, it’s better to be effective (doing the right things) rather than efficient (doing things right)

3. Publishing books is like tending a garden. Plant the seeds, nurture them and watch them grow. But if not properly treated, they can die

4. A title can falter if you become complacent with business as usual and allow routine activities to become habitual

5. All motion is not forward; all change is not positive.

6. Stop worrying about managing your time and think in terms of utilizing your available time effectively

7. Find balance. Business excellence and individual fulfillment need not be at odds.

8. The first question to ask a prospective buyer is, “Would you mind if I asked you a few questions?”

9. Market in all directions: Up (distributors, readers), down (suppliers) and across (bookstores and non-bookstore buyers)

10. People buy for rational and emotional reasons. Market to the head (price, size, form) and heart (benefits, value)

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Brian Jud is a book-marketing consultant. He is the author of How to Make Real Money Selling Books and the Executive Director of the Association of Publishers for Special Sales (APSS – www.bookapss.org– formerly SPAN). Contact Brian at brianjud@bookmarketing.com or www.bookmarketingworks.com and follow him on twitter @bookmarketing

 

Ten Book-Marketing Tips

Posted by Brian Jud on February 7, 2015 at 10:55 AM Comments comments (0)

Here are ten of my tweets from this week that may help you sell more books profitably. If you would like to follow me on Twitter, please do at @bookmarketing

 

1. Ditch the pitch – if it’s canned. Customize your presentation material to each prospect.

 

2. When is the best time to start marketing your book? Now.

 

3. What is your motivation? Mavis Cheek said, “Authors with a mortgage never get writer's block.”

 

4. “Without struggle, there can be no progress,” said Frederick Douglass

 

5. If you cannot control an outcome, respond in a calm and intelligent manner, adapting as you proceed

 

6. Some promotional tools are better suited to different titles, markets and personalities. Use the correct mix for your circumstances.

 

7. Marketing strategy is deciding which titles to publish when, and how you will package, price, distribute, promote them

 

8. Don’t get your exercise by jumping to conclusions.

 

9. Be competitive. Deliver greater value to your customers or create comparable value at lower cost, or do both.

 

10. Good enough is rarely good enough


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Brian Jud is a book-marketing consultant. He is the author of How to Make Real Money Selling Books and the Executive Director of the Association of Publishers for Special Sales (APSS – www.bookapss.org– formerly SPAN). Contact Brian at brianjud@bookmarketing.com or www.bookmarketingworks.com and follow him on twitter @bookmarketing

 


 

Ten Short Tips For Selling More Books

Posted by Brian Jud on January 30, 2015 at 9:50 AM Comments comments (0)

 

1. Selling to corp buyers is simple (not easy). Find the right buyers, then contact them with a message that is unique and important to them

 

2. When builders build, they have a plan to get it done properly, sequentially and on a strong foundation. Do the same for your book.

 

3. Trust your intuition. The voices in your head may not be real, but they usually have some good ideas

 

4. Too many potential buyers? That may be worse than not having enough. Qualify and prioritize them; spend your time calling on the top prospects

 

5. Network in person, not just online. Everyone you ever meet knows something you don’t. And you know something they don’t.

 

6. If you want to do something you'll find a way. If not you'll find an excuse. Find a way.

 

7. Don’t try to replicate what successful people do now. Do what they did when they were at your stage.

 

8. How far are you from your goal? One idea.

 

9. There are five characteristics of a good sales proposal: it should be teachable, manageable, fixable, replicatable and scalable

 

10. Research in each segment to find out what prospective customers want. Then give them what they want.


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Brian Jud is the Executive Director of the Association of Publishers for Special Sales (APSS – www.bookapss.org– formerly SPAN) and author of How to Make Real Money Selling Books. Contact Brian at brianjud@bookmarketing.com or www.premiumbookcompany.com and twitter @bookmarketing

 


 

Ten Quick Book-Marketing Tips

Posted by Brian Jud on January 27, 2015 at 10:45 AM Comments comments (0)

Here are ten quick tips that may help you sell more books profitably.

 

 

1. Define yourself as a content provider rather than a book publisher – that opens new revenue streams

 

 

2. When deciding how to publish your content, remember that form follows function

 

 

3. Some thought Goliath was too big to hit. David thought he was too big to miss. Non-bookstore marketing is a Goliath opportunity - don't miss it

 

 

4. There are five characteristics of a good sales proposal: it should be teachable, manageable, fixable, replicatable and scalable.

 

 

5. When on the air, answer questions in a way that gets your info across. Play Jeopardy. “Here is the answer. What was the question?”

 

 

6. Grow your business by creating product-line extensions such as a calendar, plush toys or party game based on your title

 

 

7. Build multiple streams of revenue from book sales, speaking, consulting, seminars, etc

 

 

8. Publishers perform marketing backwards if they accept a manuscript, produce the book and then seek a market for it

 

 

9. When talking with prospects you are not an author or publisher. You are a consultant helping them solve a business problem. Act that way.

 

 

10. A question (How much is your book?) is not an objection (That’s too high). Answer a question w/o being defensive. Respond to objections

 

 

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Brian Jud is the Executive Director of the Association of Publishers for Special Sales (APSS – www.bookapss.org– formerly SPAN) and author of How to Make Real Money Selling Books. Contact Brian at brianjud@bookmarketing.com or www.premiumbookcompany.com and twitter @bookmarketing

How to Make a Good First Impression

Posted by Brian Jud on January 23, 2015 at 11:45 AM Comments comments (0)

How to Make a Good First Impression, or Correct A Bad One, With Prospective Buyers

 

We all want to make a good first impression when calling on a sales prospect for a large book order. An order for thousands of books could be at stake. So the pressure is on you, and that alone could cause you to make a bad first impression. But there are other reasons, and some are beyond your control. The most expeditious thing to do is to control the impression you make on buyers. But if you don’t, you may be able to correct it. Here are Ten Ways to Make the Right Impression.

 

1. Understand that your words and behavior are always subject to interpretation. The buyers’ initial assessments of you are the result of their assumptions, stereotypes and cues. Dress, talk and act the image you want to convey.

 

2. Walk in the office confidently, smiling and dressed professionally. Shake hands firmly while making eye contact.

 

3. Open the conversation with something important to the buyer (family photo, diploma on the “Ego Wall,” etc)

 

4. Buyers want to work with people they trust. Develop trust initially by displaying your warmth (friendliness, respect and listening) and competence (knowledge of the person, company and industry as well as of your content and competition).

 

5. Buyers want to work with people who are not out for themselves. Early in the discussion demonstrate that you want to help them solve their problems, not just sell them your books.

 

6. Ask, don’t tell. The sales presentation is not a monologue about you and your book. Get the buyers involved in the sales process by asking questions about them and their needs and problems. What keeps them awake at night?

 

7. Actively listen to the person speaking. Use facial expressions, posture and gestures to show that you are listening. If you do not understand a particular point, ask for clarification.

 

8. If you start out on the wrong foot, rectify the situation as quickly as possible. For example, if you miss a deadline on an assignment, beat the next five deadlines to register the fact that you are serious.

 

9. Get buyers to want to work with you because you have a role in their success. Prove that your content and proposal can help the them reach their objectives better than any other promotional tool they may be considering.

 

10. Demonstrate your sincerity and ability. If buyers do not think you are capable of doing all you say you can, ask for a trail order and the chance to prove yourself.

 

 

Do not simply sit back and moan about not making the sale because the buyer had the wrong impression of you. Plan for each encounter so that each buyer sees you in the best possible light, his or her internal biases notwithstanding. Do these things and you may be able to correct the situation if you do not initially come across as you intend. It is never too late to make the right impression

 

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Brian Jud is the Executive Director of the Association of Publishers for Special Sales (APSS – www.bookapss.org– formerly SPAN) and author of How to Make Real Money Selling Books. Contact Brian at brianjud@bookmarketing.com or www.premiumbookcompany.com and twitter @bookmarketing

 

 

How to Make a Good First Impression With Prospective Buyers

Posted by Brian Jud on January 7, 2015 at 3:40 PM Comments comments (0)

We all want to make a good first impression when calling on a sales prospect for a large book order. An order for thousands of books could be at stake. So the pressure is on you, and that alone could cause you to make a bad first impression. But there are other reasons, and some are beyond your control. The most expeditious thing to do is to control the impression you make on buyers. But if you don’t, you may be able to correct it. Here are Ten Ways to Make the Right Impression on Prospective Buyers.

 

1. Understand that your words and behavior are always subject to interpretation. The buyers’ initial assessments of you are the result of their assumptions, stereotypes and cues. Dress, talk and act the image you want to convey.

 

2. Walk in the office confidently, smiling and dressed professionally. Shake hands firmly while making eye contact.

 

3. Open the conversation with something important to the buyer (family photo, diploma on the “Ego Wall,” etc)

 

4. Buyers want to work with people they trust. Develop trust initially by displaying your warmth (friendliness, respect and listening) and competence (knowledge of the person, company and industry as well as of your content and competition).

 

5. Buyers want to work with people who are not out for themselves. Early in the discussion demonstrate that you want to help them solve their problems, not just sell them your books.

 

6. Ask, don’t tell. The sales presentation is not a monologue about you and your book. Get the buyers involved in the sales process by asking questions about them and their needs and problems. What keeps them awake at night?

 

7. Actively listen to the person speaking. Use facial expressions, posture and gestures to show that you are listening. If you do not understand a particular point, ask for clarification.

 

8. If you start out on the wrong foot, rectify the situation as quickly as possible. For example, if you miss a deadline on an assignment, beat the next five deadlines to register the fact that you are serious.

 

9. Get buyers to want to work with you because you have a role in their success. Prove that your content and proposal can help the them reach their objectives better than any other promotional tool they may be considering.

 

10. Demonstrate your sincerity and ability. If buyers do not think you are capable of doing all you say you can, ask for a trail order and the chance to prove yourself.

 

 

Do not simply sit back and moan about not making the sale because the buyer had the wrong impression of you. Plan for each encounter so that each buyer sees you in the best possible light, his or her internal biases notwithstanding. Do these things and you may be able to correct the situation if you do not initially come across as you intend. It is never too late to make the right impression

 

******************************************************************

Brian Jud is the Executive Director of the Association of Publishers for Special Sales (APSS – www.bookapss.org– formerly SPAN) and author of How to Make Real Money Selling Books. Contact Brian at brianjud@bookmarketing.com or www.premiumbookcompany.com and twitter @bookmarketing

 

How to launch a new book -- free webinar tomorrow

Posted by Brian Jud on December 15, 2014 at 11:30 AM Comments comments (0)

Will your new book have life after birth? See my webinar about how to launch a new book and get a fast start selling in 2015. It is sponsored by APSS and will be held from 6:00 - 7:30 pm Eastern time on Dec 16. Register at http://tinyurl.com/n9cbrau -- if you cannot be there, register anyway and you will receive a link to the recording.

How to launch a new book -- free webinar tomorrow

Posted by Brian Jud on December 15, 2014 at 11:30 AM Comments comments (0)

Will your new book have life after birth? See my webinar about how to launch a new book and get a fast start selling in 2015. It is sponsored by APSS and will be held from 6:00 - 7:30 pm Eastern time on Dec 16. Register at http://tinyurl.com/n9cbrau -- if you cannot be there, register anyway and you will receive a link to the recording.

How to Sell Books On Home-Shopping Networks

Posted by Brian Jud on December 12, 2014 at 1:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Home-shopping networks (QVC, HSN) reach millions of people every day with information on a wide variety of products, including books. Before you try to reach buyers at these networks, consider your book's salability on television. Does your book …

 

· Demonstrate well in eight minutes of airtime? There is not a lot of time to sell your product, so it must have unique and demonstrable benefits that are easily and quickly communicated. Do not plan to talk about your book for eight minutes, but what the information in your book does for the people in the audience. This may be recipes, collectibles or other items of interest. Anya Clowers wrote Jet With Kids, a book to help people fly with kids safely and with a good experience. She could go on a home-shopping network to talk about the products that are described in her book, such as children’s seats, safe clothes and games kids can play to keep busy.

 

· Solve a common problem or make life easier? This gets back to the need for which you created your book in the first place. How will the people in the audience be better off after having purchased your book?

· Appeal to a broad audience? Your book must address the needs of a target audience, but that audience must be of sufficient size to generate large volumes of sales. Titles of interest to a small group of people will not make it past the first decision-making round.

 

· Have unique features and benefits? How is your product different from and better than competition? The answer to this question will help you sell more books to most other target segments, too.

 

· Relate to a topical or timely subject? If your product is associated with a current event it is more likely to be selected than one that is not.

 

· Have a selling price of $15.00 or higher? If not, you might consider bundling several titles or products to build the price of the package. In addition, a home-shopping network does not want to promote a book that people in the audience could buy on Amazon.com. Therefore, create a group of products that could be purchased as a set only through the network and you have a better shot at getting on.


 

 

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Brian Jud is the Executive Director of the Association of Publishers for Special Sales (APSS – www.bookapss.org– formerly SPAN) and author of How to Make Real Money Selling Books. Contact Brian at brianjud@bookmarketing.com or www.premiumbookcompany.com and twitter @bookmarketing